By Emperor of Rome Theodosius I; Emperor of Rome Theodosius I; Freeman, Charles

Examines the pivotal ways that Theodosius's decree mandating a Christian orthodoxy ended debates in regards to the nature of God, exploring the explanations why Theodosius's function used to be made to seem as a consensual ruling through the Council of Constantinople.

summary: Examines the pivotal ways that Theodosius's decree mandating a Christian orthodoxy ended debates in regards to the nature of God, exploring the explanations why Theodosius's position used to be made to seem as a consensual ruling via the Council of Constantinople

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The secret was the Roman openness to the integration of local peoples. In the short term, conquest could be exceptionally nasty. Often a city was taken and razed to the ground as an example to its neighbours. Revolts were brutally crushed, as the Jews found when three uprisings between AD 66 and 135 led to the destruction first of the Temple in Jerusalem and then of the whole city itself, which was later reconstituted as a Roman colony. 7 It was in the aftermath that local elites were drawn into Roman civilisation.

Ammianus Marcellinus provides a superb description of the entry of Constantius II into Rome in 357, the first time he had ever visited the city. ‘The emperor was greeted with welcoming cheers, which were echoed from the hills and riverbanks, but in spite of the din he exhibited no emotion, but kept the same impassive air as he commonly wore before his subjects in the provinces ... he was like a dummy, gazing straight before him as if his head were in a vice and turning neither to right nor left.

The small city of Rome had expanded from a frontier city in a vulnerable position on the river Tiber in the centre of an open plain, to control of the entire Mediterranean world. Each of its victories gave the city the confidence and manpower to search for the next. Italy, of course, was the first territory to come under Roman rule, though the mountainous central core of the Apennines made control of the peninsula a formidable challenge. Then there was Sicily and the beginnings of a provincial empire.

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